http://www.hansberryec.com.au/uploads/docs/files/TSD2%20OCT2017b.pdf

 

Workshops Index

 

 

Click on the workshop title for more information, then click 'go back to index' to come back here!

 

 

 

Advantage Parenting:

Setting your kids up for success by developing resilient and respectful attitudes

 

click to download workshop flier

 

Workshop A

Parenting in Windows: Knowing your parenting style?

 

Workshop B

Raising Kids with grit: being the Best Resilience Coach for your Kids so they can navigate life's ups and downs

 

Workshop C 

How to Catch and Build Good Behaviour: Adjusting your Parenting Spotlight to get more of the behaviour you want

 

Workshop D

The Art of Managing Uncooperative Kids: Understanding and Overcoming your Children's Misbehaviour

 

Workshop E

Rules haven't gone out of style: Building rules that stick!

 

Workshop F

'Will you two just leave one another alone?' The dos and don'ts of dealing with sibling fighting 

 

Workshop G

‘Get off that Computer!’ Clever ways to manage kids’ screen time

 

Workshop H

Manners: The unfair advantage that some parents give their children! 

 

Workshop I

What to do when your kids have become Mealtime Militia: Reclaiming Mealtimes as happy family time

 

Workshop J

'My Child is being picked on!': Sensibly navigating school social problems with your child

 

Workshop K

'Mum, I'm Bored!' Ideas to deal with kids' boredom

 

Workshops for Schools

 

 

 

 

Relational Teaching Level 1: A Primer for Working Restoratively

 

 

Relational Teaching Level 2: Embedding Relational Teaching

 

 

Working Restoratively in Schools: Level 1 Awareness of RP’s for all staff

 

 

Working Restoratively in Schools: Level 2: Small Group and Classroom Applications of RP’s

 

Working Restoratively in Schools: Level 3:Restorative Conference Facilitator Training 

 

A 2-hour Introduction to the Emotional Foundations of Restorative Practices: The Psychology of Emotion in Restorative Practice

 

Working Restoratively in Schools Mid-Implementation Day: Keeping the ball rolling toward whole-school Implementation

 

 

Restorative Practices in your Child’s School: What’s it all about? Two-Hour Parent Workshop

 

 

Teaching Restorative Thinking and Behaviour to Primary Students: Using Circle-Time to teach Restorative ways of Living

 

 

Being a Restorative Kid / Being a Restorative Student: Sessions for students R-12 on Restorative Practices

 

 

What can you ‘restorative’
what can’t you ‘restorative’ and how you can behave restoratively when not doing a restorative?

 

 

Workshops to develop Circle-Time: The Seedbed of a Restorative Approach

 

Introduction to Circle Solutions (Circle Time)

 

 

Teaching Restorative Thinking and Behaviour to Primary Students: Using Circle-Time to teach Restorative ways of Living

 

 

Circle Solutions Trainer Training

 

Workshops for Understanding and Tricky Student Behaviour

 

Feeling more Relaxed in the face of Tricky Behaviours: Understanding Emotion and the Goals of Misbehaviour

 

 

Understanding the Four Goals of Misbehaviour: Responding in Calm and Clever ways

 

 

Shame and other Emotions of Connection and Engagement: Engaging Kid’s Hearts and Minds to bring Positive behaviour Change

 

 

‘The Teacher Hates Me’: Getting Better Outcomes when Discussing Behaviour with a Middle School Student

 

 

Workshops for Understanding and Working with Dyslexia

 

The 3Ds: Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyscalculia: A Workshop for  Teachers, Parents and school support staff

 

 

Emma and Bill’s Amazing talk about Dyslexia: A Workshop for Students and Teachers

 

 

Teaching Students with Dyslexia:  Levels 1 – 3

 

 

The Secret Life of the Dyslexic Learner: Simple ideas for Teachers

 

 

Workshops for Understanding and Working with Autism Spectrum Disorders

 

Supporting a Classmate with Asperger’s Syndrome: A Workshop for Students and Teachers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent Workshops for

Advantage Parenting: Setting your kids up for success by developing resilient and respectful attitudes

 

 

Book a series of 2 Advantage Parenting workshops and receive a 15% discount and 2 complimentary copies of Raising Beaut Kids for your school or organisation

                     

 

 

Restorative Parenting : Restorative Schooling

For a school wanting to give parents a better idea of what Restorative Parenting  can look like - this is the book you need to be telling your parents about. Raising Beaut Kids captures the essence of authoritative parenting.

 

 

 

The introduction to Raising Beaut Kids: "Parenting in Windows" explains the Social Control Window - the very same model schools use to keep their bearings for their practice to ensure it remains restorative and authoritative.

Imagine the power of being able to talk the same language with your parents about what it means to be responsible for young people, as we help them learn to become more responsible for themselves and others. Having Bill speak with your parent community about authoritative parenting - the type of parenting recommended Raising Beaut Kids - can help increase the chance that home and school will be more aligned in their management styles. When this happens, we place young people in a more emotionally steady place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Workshop A

Parenting in Windows:

Knowing your parenting style?

 

 

 

We parent in a time where it is easy to be utterly bamboozled by the myriad of mixed messages from the media and experts about what constitutes sensible parenting. All sorts of questions and guilty thoughts bounce around inside our heads.

“Am I too strict – do I say ‘no’ too often?”

“Do we give our kids the freedom they need to make sensible choices on their own?”

Am I too lenient on issues that really matter?”

“Should I do what my parents did – were they right after all?”

 

When we feel we’ve struck a good balance with how we work with our kids, life throws us a new and unchartered parenting moment that has us questioning the very core of our parenting (again)!

One way to bring some balance to our thinking about parenting our kids, no matter what their age, is to consider the notion of parenting style. This fun and interactive workshop proposes four modes of being in authority. In our parenting, we tend to use one of these styles:  punitive, permissive, neglectful or authoritative more than the others. In ‘Raising Beaut Kids’ we have explained these styles using a nifty model called the Social Control Window so it’s no wonder that this great model becomes the centrepiece of this workshop.

So what’s your style? Are you up to the challenge to discover which style you lean towards? Come along to this session filled with laughs as we look at Parenting in Windows and do fun some navel gazing about which of these windows gives us the best chance of raising resilient, well-adjusted kids!

 

 

 

 

Bill came to Prince Alfred College (Adelaide) and ran the introductory 'Parenting in Windows' workshop. From word one, Bill had all 150 of us, parents and staff, laughing hard and thinking deeply about our own parenting styles and which style best serves our children. Being a dad of three himself, Bill engaged us all with his stories, his knowledge and his wit. This evening kick started our 'Raising Beaut Kids' series off nicely. We can't wait to have Bill back.

Sean Watt,

Deputy Head of Preparatory School,

Prince Alfred College.

 

We really enjoyed the interactive participation using the social window to help us understand the different styles of parenting and what our default style is when we are under pressure. We could have a laugh and learn. Bill reinforced the idea that consequences were necessary but were not about hurting or punishing children

 

Carol West,

Deputy Principal

Gilles St Primary School

 

 

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Workshop B

Raising Kids with Grit

Being the Best Resilience Coach for your Kids so they can navigate life's ups and downs

 

 

So what is this thing called resilience?  It must be important because the experts seem to be talking a lot about it and how important it is to kids’ long term mental health and happiness.

How do I make sure my kids develop emotional resilience?

How can I teach them to see the bright side and bounce back when life throws a challenge at them?

What is my child’s school doing to develop resilience and how can I partner with them to make my child more resilient?

Is it normal for kids to be sad sometimes? Does this mean they will become depressed?

Why is my 13 year old so negative about everything? Is she depressed already?

 

When we think about it, we remember that it’s the very nature of life to throw disappointments and setbacks at us from the moment we struggle down the birth canal to our very last breath. The painful truth for us all is that this of course is also true for our children. It was once said that life is a contact sport. I think this is true! Trying to push every obstacle out of our kids’ way and eliminate every hardship in our kids’ lives is exhausting and downright harmful to their emotional development. As tempting as it is!

Is there a sure fire list of things we can to do strengthen our kids’ resilience? Well, it depends who you talk to. What we can say confidently is that our kids watch us very carefully. Every day, every moment, we are modelling to our children how to react to, and how to think about life’s challenges and hiccups.

This informative, humorous and highly popular workshop is based on Chapter 10 of ‘Raising Beaut Kids’. Bill will unpick what we do know that is important to give our kids the best chance to develop their emotional rebound from life’s insatiable challenges. Bill cover’s the 10C’s of resilience building and provides parents with a smorgasbord of helpful parenting ideas to build kids’ resilience muscle.

 

 

As a school community, we feel that the development of resilience in children is important from an early age so that our children learn to deal with the inevitable ups and downs of life that constantly occur in an ever changing, rapid world.  From the beginning of his workshop, Bill was able to create an atmosphere where participants felt comfortable and were able to relate to the humorous but very important messages explored.  We also left with practical ideas and tips to try both in the classroom and at home.  Thanks Bill!

Todd La Forgia

Deputy Principal- Head of Primary

Blackfriars Priory School

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Workshop C

How to Catch and Build Good Behaviour

Adjusting your Parenting Spotlight to get more of the behaviour you want

 

 

If you showed 100 people a page of white paper with a small black dot and asked them where their eyes focused, I’m certain at least 90 of them would respond that they looked at the black dot!

This simple principle explains how many of us look at our kid’s behaviour. Every day, each moment, our kids are in reality spending a lot of their time being generally compliant and cooperative (the white space on the page), but what do we find ourselves talking (or yelling at) to our kids about? You’ve got it – the black dot behaviours!

Now, don’t feel bad because you’re not alone. It’s very normal to pay attention to the behaviours that irritate or annoy us and to let the complaint, considerate or even helpful things that our kids do slip by unnoticed and unmentioned.

So, we need a little behavioural theory to hang out hats on. In our more reflective moments, we remember what the experts have always told us – that praising positive behaviour is infinitely more powerful in shaping behaviour than criticising, lecturing and nagging when kids get it wrong.  But, because of our natural negativity bias (black dot gazing), many of us would admit that in the hustle and bustle of life raising kids, we fall headlong into the trap of only talking about behaviour with our kids when they behave uncooperatively, inconsiderately, or are just being naughty!  

This workshop, that expands on chapter 2 of my highly popular book ‘Raising Beaut Kids’ offering powerful reminders and practical strategies about what we can do to catch and build positive behaviours. Parents leave this fun and clever workshop primed to spend a little more time looking at the white space, and a little less time gazing at the black dot. When we improve this balance we bring the best out of our kids, more often.

 

 

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Workshop D

The Art of Managing Uncooperative Kids

Understanding and Overcoming your children's Misbehaviour

 

Regardless of how well we do setting rules, trying to stay focused on the positive behaviours of our kids and keeping mindful of our parenting style, there will always be tricky kids and tricky moments where our kids behave in ways that stretch our resources to breaking point.  You know just what I’m talking about, don’t you!

In these moments many parents say that their theoretical skills dessert them. In these high-pressure moments we’ve all said and done things that we’ve regretted later. Once we’ve cooled off, we have been able to identify exactly what we should have done! It feels awful, doesn’t it?

And then there are those parents who just seem to handle the trickiest of kid behaviours with poise and quiet determination – almost as if they had a plan in mind before the moment happened. Guess what – they probably did have a plan! So, let’s take some time together to talk about things like:

How often we nag or criticise our kids and whether this actually works for us

Just how often our kids really do behave poorly – using hard evidence

How well we manage ourselves in moments when our kids are struggling to manage themselves

Which behaviours to call kids out on and which ones to walk away from

Consequences, which ones, when, how often and how severe?

Whether we can deliver consequences without looking like the enemy

 

Take the challenge and see how many practical ideas you can gather up in this fun and clever workshop on the art of managing tricky kid behaviour.

 

Bill Hansberry’s ‘tricky kid behaviour’ workshop offers realistic, achievable and practical solutions to struggling and confused parents.  Bill enthusiastically presents real life examples to relate to parents in their trickiest of parenting moments – you are not alone and you are in control!  Some great practical ideas and tips to inspire and motivate parents, a worthwhile experience!”

Callie Manser, Keith War Memorial Community Centre Kindergarten

 

 

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Workshop E

Rules haven't gone out of style!  

Building rules that stick!

 

…If a visitor came into our home and watched our family working really well together, how would they describe our family and what was happening?

How would we be treating each other?

How would we be cooperating?

Who would be doing the jobs around the house?

How would problems and upsets be worked out?

 

The above questions are a great place to start when we think about building effective expectations of behaviour in our home. This Workshop, grown from Chapter 1 of the highly popular parenting book ‘Raising Beaut Kids’ looks at what we know works and doesn’t work when we take on the business of creating household rules.

Do we need rules in the home? Absolutely! Can families develop clever mission statements to base their rules on? Absolutely! How important are family meetings in developing considerate and responsible kids? Really important! Rules, developed in family meetings, keep everyone aware of what is required of them so the family can stay on track and operating effectively. Rules create boundaries, putting kids in charge of their own behaviour. When kids know where the boundaries lie they feel safer, steadier and develop considerate styles of thinking that serve well them into the future.

If you think this sounds a bit fanciful, take the challenge. I’ll share practical and simple ideas from my own, and other families that have helped them to make fast and effective tweaks to how the family hums!

So, come along and explore some very easy steps we can all take to set up rules that stick with kids aged from toddlers to teens.

 

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Workshop F

'Will you two just leave one another alone?' 

The dos and don'ts of dealing with sibling fighting

 

They just seem to be at one another all of the time. Sometimes it seems as if my kids hate each other. Does this go on in other families or are we just unlucky!

The good news is that sibling fighting and sibling rivalry is as old as time itself! As soon as kids have to share the love and attention of parents as well resources in a home the stage is set for jealousy, challenge and conflict.

So what do we need to know to keep sibling conflict within healthy limits? That’s right – you won’t stop it entirely, but we do know that parents who school themselves in some fundamental knowledge about sibling fighting are able manage it in clever ways and stop scrapping between the kids completely dominating the vibe in the home.

In this funny and highly interactive workshop, taken from Chapter 4 of “Raising Beaut Kids” Bill puts sibling fighting and rivalry under the microscope as we look at:

What fuels sibling fighting

What parents unwittingly do that fires sibling fighting up

Whether your home is competitive or collaborative (we use a cool questionnaire for this)

What to do about getting your kids on the same team more of the time

What sibling abuse is and what you can do if things have gotten this bad

When to step in and when to step back and just observe your kids’ conflicts

How to teach the kids to restore peace in the aftermath of sibling conflict

 

Parents find this a truly enlightening workshop and often report almost instant changes that have come to their homes with just a tweak of a few of their responses to their kids’ fighting.

Bill's workshop on sibling rivalry gave our parents great insight to why our children behave the way they do with their siblings.  By explaining the different sibling dynamics Bill provided the tools to improve relationships reduce many of the sibling fights that often flare up!  ...there are now more harmonious Flagstaff Hill Primary School family households thanks to Bill’s talk!

Narelle Hodgson, Governing Council Chairperson

Flagstaff Hill R-7 School

 

 

 

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Workshop G

‘Get off that Computer!’

Clever ways to manage kids’ screen time

 

Have you heard of IAD? It stands for ‘Internet Addiction Disorder’ and it is now listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V), and is a very real disorder!  

Let’s face it, putting the smart phone or tablet down, or switching the computer off can be a hard task for all of us – kids and adults alike. But:

Is your child’s attachment to screens getting in the way of real time with friends, relaxation time, school, study or sport?

Is your child fanatical about getting to a screen each day?

When they get to a screen, are they stuck to it for hours on end and do you face a meltdown at the mention that they hop off the computer?

Has their talk become dominated by what’s happened on-line, or that game they are playing lately?

 

If you’ve answered ‘yes’ to any, (or all) of the above, be alert but not alarmed!  The fact is that you’re not alone in this brave new world that our kids were born into, but we merely inhabit! You don’t need to become a Screen Nazi and remove all screen time from your kids in one foul swoop! In fact, this would be counterproductive because kids stick even closer to forbidden fruit!

This popular and informative workshop takes a sensible and balanced look at what the experts suggest is a healthy amount of time on screens for kids and ways parents can gradually bring their kids’ and teens’ time on screens back within healthy limits.

We also look at some simple safety tips that clever parents use in their homes to minimise the risk of their kids falling victim to the darker side of the internet.

 

 

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Workshop H

Manners

The unfair advantage that some parents give their children!

 

Are manners a lost art? Should we be making a concerted effort to instil  'please', 'thanks', 'you first' and 'Im well thanks, how are you?' in our kids? Do you model these social graces in your dealings with your kids and with other people in front of your kids?

As our lives gather pace and become increasing individualistic it is too easy to forget that to get what we want from others, they need to feel as though they are getting what they want from us! Recognition and respect is a powerful currency the world around that our kids need to learn to deal in. Like it or not, good manners are absolutely vital to giving our kids an advantage in the world.

Make no mistake, the way your kids present themselves to you, to friends, to other parents, to child care professionals, to teachers and other school staff, to sports coaches, instructors, tutors, health care professionals and even their employers will influence how much care, interest and opportunity they receive from others.

This workshop looks at the finer art of teaching our kids to be friendly, agreeable and pleasant to be around. You might have guessed it already, most of this comes from the kinds of behaviours we model to our kids. But that's not enough, we also need to insist our kids overcome natural shyness or mild anxiety to show good manners to others. 

 

 

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Bill spoke in a way that was captivating and his use of examples and ‘recipe rescues’ made his ideas and solutions easy to follow.  He is very engaging and made everyone feel welcomed with his easy going manner.  This is one comment we received from a parent who attended the Workshop: “Tracy & I found it very informative and interesting and I wanted to hear more!! I would definitely be interested in another workshop. Big thanks to Bill I would certainly motivate other friends / school mums to attend. 

Narelle Hodgson Governing Council Chairperson, Flagstaff Hill R-7 School

 

 

 

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Workshop I

 

What to when your kids have become Mealtime Militia

Reclaiming mealtimes as happy family time

 

Do you wonder if having the family sitting and eating a drama free family meal is just a dream? Do the kids ruin eating times with complaints about the food, refuse to eat or eat in slow motion? Do you find yourself constantly reminding, nagging and bribing to get the kids to stay at the table and eat just a bit more? Have meal times become a battlefield?

We know that sharing a meal is  an important bonding time for families. Families who have dedicated meal times where they all sit together to eat simply do better. 

Happy mealtimes are not beyond your reach. With a few well-placed tweaks and tune-ups, those pesky attention seeking behaviours that have run riot can be brought to heel and meal times can start to take on a more settled and orderly appearance. This workshop contains ideas and strategies that are applicable right across the board, not just at the dinner table. 

 

 

 

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Workshop J

'My Child is being picked on!'

Sensibly navigating school social problems with your child

 

It happens to every child at some stage in their schooling and some kids are much unluckier than others. It often starts out as a conflict but can soon turn into harassment, unfair treatment and even bullying. It is truly heartbreaking when we know our kids are having a tough time at school. Our inner Lioness kicks in and we want to fix the problems (and fix those other kids who are making our child's life miserable!) Afer all, school is supposed to be a happy place where kids feel accepted and safe - or is it? 

If we are realistic, we will remember that school wasn't always great. Others weren't always kind to us and there were some times when things went awfully wrong. We might have been on the receiving end of some really mean behaviour. How our parents spoke to us, and what they did (and perhaps didn't do) in these moments shaped how what we think about conflict and upsets and how we respond to them. 

This workshop has been written with an understanding of how much it hurts to see our kids in social pain. It draws on what we know about developing resilience and teaching kids to think logically about conflict and mean behaviour. There are sensible ideas for working with your child to understand what is happening and to activate their own problem-solving strategies to see themselves through these awful, but inevitable times at school. 

We can teach our kids to cross the road but we can't stop the traffic for them. 

 

 

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Workshop K

'Mum, I'm Bored!'

Ideas to deal with kids' boredom

As soon as we ask the kids to get off of their screens, or they get home from an exciting outing we are a faced with 'Mum I'm bored!' or 'What can I do?'. Being bored is an experience we've almost completely removed from our kids' lives, and believe it or not, our kids mental health is worse for it. 

This workshop explores what boredom is and how it isn't the evil we have come to believe it is. We will look at clever ideas to help kids use their bored moments to switch on their creative thinking to decide what to do next that might be stimulating  to them or helpful to others.

 

 

 

 

Other Workshop Topics Include:

Designs to phase-out tantruming behaviours in children and young teens

 

Dressing Dilemmas: Dealing with clothes and appearance meltdowns

 

Navigating the morning madness: Ideas to organise your way to a better morning routine

 

Chores, Pocket Money and Saving: teaching kids to belong to the family by contributing

 

 

 

 

 Find out how to apply for 2018 Funding to hold a "Raising Beaut Kids" parent workshop.

 

 

 

 

Download this Month's Free Chapter!

 

 

 

 

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Workshops for Developing a Restorative Culture in Schools 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Relational Teaching Level 1

A Primer for Working Restoratively

 

Full day Workshop

 

This workshop has been developed for schools who want a less-direct entry point to Restorative Practices – in other words, for schools looking for a ‘warm up’ or a ‘primer’ to developing a restorative culture.

 

After coming agreement with each other about how we will interact to get the most of the day, we explore:

 

  • Our personal values in relation to student misconduct

  • The outcomes we want for students when they get it wrong and what does and doesn’t deliver these outcomes

  • Behaviour Management from the inside out – The ‘why’, ‘how’ and ‘what’ of behaviour management (Based on Simon Sinek’s work)

  • Understanding the need to belong and the 4 Goals of Misbehaviour

  • Bill’s 6 Tips for having better conversations with students about their behaviour

 

Participants engage with one another in circles and small groups throughout this workshop.

 

Following this workshop, leadership (upon request) will be coached by Bill in planning to keep the concepts alive in professional conversations and staff meetings.

 

 

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Relational Teaching Level 2

Embedding Relational Teaching

 

Full day Workshop – prerequisite: Relational Teaching Level 1

 

In this follow up to level 1, Bill works with staff to further embed the understandings and skills previously covered. Key concepts from level 1 are revised and new concepts communicated:

 

  • Engaging highly challenging students relationally – why bother?

  • Team Quiz on the 4 Goals of Misbehaviour (Quiz Night Format!)

  • Recapping Bill’s 6 Tips for having better conversations with students about their behaviour

  • Exploring typical tricky disciplinary scenarios from your school by analysing the student’s goal and using restorative language to engage emotion deeper thinking

 

Following this workshop, leadership (upon request) will be coached by Bill in planning to keep the concepts alive in professional conversations and staff meetings. The suggested next step is Working Restoratively in Schools Level 1 (Awareness).

 

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Working Restoratively in Schools:

Level 1: Awareness of RP’s for all staff

 

Full day Workshop

 

Restorative Practices are an excellent vehicle for whole school improvement. A commitment to bringing the behaviour of staff into line with restorative values, yields incredible results in student learning outcomes and school climate. Why? Because the emotional literacy of the entire school has been raised - and this transformation has been led by the adults.

 

This level 1 workshop builds an awareness of what it means to be a Restorative school and brings staff but-in on an emotional level.

 

A strong focus is put on our values in the morning session as staff uncovers their own deeply held beliefs about student conduct (and misconduct) and how this aligns with the principles of Restorative Justice. We explore the important difference between desired outcomes and strategies in addressing wrongdoing or disruption and have conversations about what does and doesn't deliver us the outcomes we really want.

 

What  will crystallize for staff is that Restorative Practice is a pedagogy, not just a few bits and pieces to add to our behaviour management tool-bag.

 

In the middle session we look at the effectiveness of punishment and its consequences in terms of emotion and engagement. The first half of the restorative questions (the individual script)  is introduced and explained in terms their ability to:

  • keep young people engaged and in a space where they can think of others, not only themselves.

 

  • Keep us on track in what we say to students so we don't get blown off course by secondary behaviour or a snooty attitude from the student

 

We also explore how different 'types' of students need different levels of support to engage successfully in restorative conversations because no one size fits all!

 

Afternoon Skills Focus

The afternoon session sees participants focusing on a particular skill area from the restorative practices continuum:  (a) Positive Correction strategies for restorative behaviour management in classrooms, (b) Individual Conferening with students or (c) observing a mock Formal Conference. Details below.

 

A) Positive Correction - In his new book 'A Practical Introduction to Restorative Practice in Schools' Bill has added positive correction to the beginning of the continuum of restorative responses to acknowledge a set of extremely important management strategies that effective teachers employ to keep initial behaviour correction low key and respectful (least intrusive).

 

Skills taught are tactical ignoring, use of proximity, non-verbal behaviour cues, quiet questioning, pause direction, rule reminders, take up time, acknowledging feeling and deflecting and choice direction. These approaches don't use the restorative questions as many have come to know them, but are viewed as restorative because they are least intrusive, respectful and keep emotion in mind. 

 

OR

 

B) Individual Scripted Restorative Questioning. As we move up the continuum of restorative responses we move into the use of the individual script to use in one to one restorative conversations with students. These are the 1:1 chats that teachers might have with students when positive correction strategies haven't been effective. Participants will learn the individual script and it's intent, and then practice using it  variety of scenarios. This paired practice takes place under Bill’s watchful eye!

 

OR


C) observing Bill modelling how to conduct a formal restorative conference* to address significant high-level incidents of misconduct, using members of the group as fictional characters.

NOTE: this option works best when the school provides Bill with a scenario. This may be an incident that has taken place in the school, or a likely event in the school’s context. Upon deciding on the specifics of the fictional incident with the school contact person, Bill prepares the staff who will play the different characters before the afternoon session.

*Formal Restorative Conference Facilitator Training is a 2 day training offered by Bill for those who’ve completed this level (level 1), and /or level 2.

 

 

Your staff will conclude this day in a reflective mindset, ready to further explore what a restorative approach means for their day to day work with young people.

 

Following this workshop, Bill (upon request) will work with leadership to convene an RP's Implementation Team of passionate and committed staff members who will work strategically to lead the implementation of Restorative Pedagogy.

The suggested next step is Working Restoratively in Schools Level 2 (Small Group and Classroom Applications of RP's). Alternatively, the Implementation team may decide to develop Circle Time at this stage.

 

 

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Working Restoratively in Schools:

Level 2: Small Group and Classroom Applications of RP’s

 

Full day workshop

Pre-Requisite training: Level 1 

 

Picking up where the awareness level workshop left off, the level 2 day picks up where the level 1 workshop finished and sees us moving up the continuum of restorative practice to look at proactive conferencing (using restorative questions to help students agree on expected behaviours before things go wrong). Bill models this process in a circle and participants then group off to create their own proactive conference scripts for use back at school.

 

Next, staff reflect on their experiences with using restorative pedagogy with students (since the level 1 workshop) and create ‘burning questions’ to bring to the circle for conversation. This important exercise encourages honest straight-talk about the aspects of restorative work that is worrying staff. If ignored, these questions act as roadblocks to the change process.  

 

The Social Control Window is revised and staff play a fun team game that embeds notions of ‘NOT’ doing things, or doing things ‘TO’, ‘FOR’ or ‘WITH’, students in disciplinary scenarios.

 

In the afternoon we look at small group conferencing using both ‘sides’ of the restorative script to encourage reflection, understanding, responsibility taking  and restoration in the wake of harm and wrongdoing.

 

Small group conferencing is modelled by Bill (as many times as needed) in a fishbowl format and staff are then invited to head off in groups and play with a range of realistic scenarios to develop their small group conferencing skills.

 

At the end of this day staff report a deeper understanding of the range of ways Restorative Pedagogy can weave through their work with students.  

 

Following this workshop, Bill will (upon request) work with the Implementation Team to plan the next 6-12 months of implementation.

The suggested next step is the Working Restoratively in Schools Mid-Implementation Day: (Keeping the ball rolling toward whole-school Implementation).

Bill will also make recommendations about Restorative Conference Facilitator Training for a selected group of staff who will share the responsibility of planning, facilitating and modeling conferencing for staff.  Circle Time training for all staff will be recommended by Bill at this stage.

 

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Working Restoratively in Schools:

Level 3: Restorative Conference Facilitator Training

 

2 Full Days

Pre-Requisite training: Level 1 or Level 2

 

“ An engaging presentation, hands on and direct. Bill was excellent as a facilitator.”

Head of House - Mount Carmel College SA.

 

Schools that are serious about developing a restorative culture must be using restorative conferencing to adress their serious issues and incidents. After all, this is what Restorative Justice was designed for. Without a formal conferencing program, headed by specially trained conference facilitators, schools very quickly slip back into short term punitive reactions to incidents of high level misconduct and soon end up where thay started out. A restorative culture does not embed. 

 

This training is for those who will be responsible for preparing and facilitating restorative responses to major incidents of harm and conflict, this intensive 2 day workshop will train participants in the skills and understandings needed to work with highly distressed children and adults to resolve serious matters through restorative conferencing (the highest point on the Restorative Practices Continuum).

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Communicate with those harmed and those responsible for the ham (as well as others involved in an issue or incident) in the lead up to, during, and after the conference
  • Understand and manage the emotional dynamics of conferencing through a deeper knowledge of Affect Script Psychology and Shame Management practices
  • Assess the appropriateness of a conference based on discussions with involved parties prior to conference
  • Assess and manage risks involved with conferencing
  • Organise, plan and facilitate a conference within a given timeframe
  • Prepare participants for a conference
  • Manage and facilitate a conference
  • Use a repertoire of conference facilitation skills to ensure that conferences are safe for all involved
  • Produce a written conference report / conference agreement
  • Undertake conference follow up in a thorough manner

Participants will be immersed in the practicalities of Restorative Conferencing through immersion in a series of role-played conference scenarios.  

Participants will receive a full workshop manual and a copy of Bill’s book “Working Restoratively in Schools” as a supplement to the manual. 

 

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An Introduction to the Emotional Foundations of Restorative Practices: 

The Psychology of Emotion in Restorative Practice

 

This workshop that can be from 2-hour workshop, through to a whole day aims to take any restorative practioner to a deeper level of understanding about the emotional dynamics of Restorative Practices.

 

Participants are introduced to Affect Script Psychology (after Tomkins) as they examine the importance of shame and humiliation as either a helper or hindrance to the process of reconnecting people in the wake of harm or conflict.

 

A fictional case study about Bradley, a young man with learning disabilities and a long history of shame based behavioural disturbances will be used to place our learning into context. Bradley's responses to a moment of social disconnection will be looked at through a model known as 'The Compass of Shame' (Nathanson).

 

This highly popular workshop holds groups spellbound as they learn more about the biologically hardwired affects that run the motivational systems of all human beings.

 

 

Bill presented a workshop about affect and shame: the emotional foundations of Restorative Practices. We have been implementing Restorative Practices for a couple of years, however this workshop was vital in developing our understanding of the emotional drivers behind Restorative Practices. It also helped staff to appreciate the ways that they react to student’s behaviour in the classroom, and to monitor these reactions. The workshop was engaging, and based on sound theoretical principles. It was great to work with Bill again on our Restorative journey.

 

Alicia Puiatti Wellbeing Coordinator- St John's Highgate

 

 

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Working Restoratively in Schools Mid-Implementation Day:

Keeping the ball rolling toward whole-school Implementation

 

It’s perfectly normal for schools to become ‘stuck’ mid-way through the implementation of any cultural change. This marks a watershed moment for schools in the implementation of Restorative Pedagogy where the school will either re-group, re energise and push forward, or slip back into old, less effective, (but more comfortable) ways of doing things.

 

The mid-implementation day has been developed to help staff remind one another of the reasons they signed up to be a restorative school in the first place. Staff work together to identify current strengths and weaknesses in the school’s model of Restorative practices so a shared vision for the future crystallizes.

 

Bill plans this day in consultation with the RP’s Implementation Team and /or school leadership to ensure that the workshop format is a ‘best fit’ for the school’s particular point of implementation.

 

 

Features of this workshop include:

 

  • A staff circle reflection on the Restorative journey so far – what’s changed?

  • The keystones of restorative conferencing (after Jansen and Matla)

  • An activity where staff plot on the Restorative Practices Continuum the school’s strong and weak spots and reflect on what this means now, and in the future for continued implementation.

  • A recap of restorative the restorative questions and their purpose

 

At the conclusion of this day staff will have developed a shared understanding of the ‘where to next’ for continued implementation of Restorative Pedagogy. This will provide the Implementation Team and/or Leadership Team with an important springboard for ongoing planning.

 

Following this workshop, Bill will (upon request) work with the Implementation Team to plan the next phase of implementation. This will involve a focus on a model of organisational change as outlined by Thorsborne and Blood (2013)

 

 

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Restorative Practices in your Child’s School:

What’s it all about? Two-Hour Parent Workshop

 

Communicating the school’s purpose and intent in developing a restorative culture to your parent community is absolutely vital. These are the very people you will want to support your approaches, especially when it’s their own children involved.

 

Looking at Restorative Practices from the outside in, it’s very easy to get the wrong idea about what we stand for when we immerse students in Restorative Approaches to address conflict and wrongdoing. Some parents can be quick to judge us as being permissive with the ‘naughty kids’ unless we get good at communicating how are very serious about setting high standards for student conduct and holding everyone in the community accountable to these standards.

 

Like it or not, we are in the business of marketing to our community the merits of what we choose to do. A failure to do this presents a major hurdle to the cultural change you are working toward.

 

This 2 hour parent evening gets right to the heart of what it means to set high expectations for behaviour, offer high levels of support to meet these standards and hold people accountable when they fail to meet standards.

 

Bill begins by sharing a true story of a student who was badly bullied and the restorative process that followed that restored a sense of control for this young man. This is a story that gets to the heart of what Restorative Pedagogy is all about and wins hearts and minds in the process. This story becomes the common thread that runs through the rest of the workshop, tying together theory and application.

 

The Social Control Window is clearly explained so parents can see what a high control / high support environment looks like and why it brings the best out of young people. Research evidence of the positive impact of a restorative culture in schools from across the globe is also shared.

 

The history of Restorative Justice is looked at, including its origins in criminal justice, placing Restorative Pedagogy within an important broader context.

 

This is a highly engaging 2 hour session that paves the way for a parenting workshop “Parenting in Windows” from Bill’s parenting book “Raising Beaut Kids: Recipes for Parents on when to say ‘yes’ and how to say ‘no’”.

 

Being a parent of three school-aged children himself, Bill speaks to the heart of parents.

 

 

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Teaching Restorative Thinking and Behaviour to Primary Students:

Using Circle-Time to teach Restorative ways of Living

 

Workshops from 2 hours to a full day

 

Thinking and Behaving Restoratively doesn't come naturally to all kids. Restorative Practices is a way of thinking about people and events and it's a frame of reference that we can teach to young people. Call it social skilling with a restorative justice flavour! What's the result? Calmer, more peaceful and more productive classrooms and playgrounds. Evidence shows that schools that actively teach Restorative Thinking and Behaviour to students report less bullying behaviour, less anxious kids, less anxious parents and happier teachers. 

In this workshop Bill will demonstrate ways to teach restorative thinking and skills to primary children through the well-established pedagogy of Circle Time. This fun and interactive workshop will take staff through activities from Bill’s resource “The Grab and Go Circle Time Kit for Teaching Restorative Behaviour”, giving staff colleagues a good feel for the content and approaches that builds restorative brains. As it turns out, this workshop is also great at developing more restorative thinking styles in staff as well!

 

 

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Being a Restorative Kid / Being a Restorative Student:

Sessions for students R-12 on Restorative Practices

 

Because Restorative Practice is pedagogy, we need to teach it to students in a similar way we teach other curriculum. The good thing about this Restorative Practices as a curriculum area is that the lessons are always real-life, so making it relevant isn’t a problem!

This highly sought after series of workshops is divided into Early Years, Middle School and Upper Secondary.

 

The Early Years sessions are 30 minute Circle-Time sessions that teachers choose directly from Bill’s Grab and Go Circle Time Kit for Teaching Restorative Behaviour. Popular session choices are:

 

Session 6: What we need when we are hurt

Session 7: What we need when we have hurt others

Session 8: Being strong and truthful

Session 9: Seeing things differently (perception)

Session 10: Blaming and Fixing

Session 11: Questions that help fix things

Session 12: Fixing up and showing sorry

Session 13: Forgiving others

 

 

The Middle Years Students also enjoy the above sessions from the Grab and Go Manual, but Bill has developed a 1 hour workshop called ‘Dealing with Feelings when things go wrong’. This workshop teaches the important concept of shame, and what happens inside of all of us in a moment when something goes wrong with our friendships or someone tells us we have ‘mucked up’.

 

The Compass of Shame is introduced (which kids always understand easily) and the power of restorative practices is explained as a way to help people deal with the moments that trigger feelings of yuck and to get on with the important business of repairing and growing from moments when we have managed ourselves poorly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The upper secondary session deals with a scenario called ‘The New Kid’, where a girl, new to the school has been subjected to harassment and cyber bullying. Students work in a circle, small groups and pairs to look at that responses from the school would deliver the best outcomes for Erin (the new girl) and hold those responsible for the attacks accountable in a way that will increase empathy and moral behaviour.

 

 

These sessions are always well received by students, teachers and leaders - who are of course asked by Bill to join the sessions and participate as they would if they were students! The understanding and perspectives shared by staff and students in these sessions are truly transformative and improve relationships between staff and students.

 

 

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What can you ‘restorative’?
what can’t you ‘restorative’? And how you can behave restoratively when not doing a 'restorative'?

A Staff workshop on which issues can be addressed restoratively, and which need more thought.

 

So, your school is implementing Restorative Practices and there is confusion among staff about which types of misconduct can be addressed with restorative approaches and which can’t be.

You’re not alone! This is an issue that all restorative schools come across. It’s a very normal part of the cultural shift away from a reliance on punishment to restorative dialogue in addressing wrongdoing and disruption. If questions like “so how can you have a restorative chat with a student about running around corners, or having their shirt untucked?” didn’t come up, I’d be worried!

 

In this two hour workshop, Bill has one simple aim: to promote dialogue among your staff about one key question:

 

“How can we keep communicating to young people that everything they do or don’t do will impact someone, somewhere, somehow?”

 

When we shift our thinking into this space, we get better at helping young people consider “how did my behaviour affect others?” After all, this is the very thinking we are trying to teach young people in restorative schools.

 

This workshop brings staff to a shared understanding so they can continue to develop their own restorative style with confidence.

 

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Workshops to develop Circle-Time:

The Seedbed of a Restorative Approach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction to Circle Solutions (Circle Time)

 

Delivered by Bill as an Associate of Sue Roffey

 

Circle Time is not just a program: it is a democratic and respectful pedagogy to develop social/emotional skills and a positive class ethos. Schools wishing to develop a Restorative culture cannot do so without ensuring that Circle Time is a regular occurrence in all classrooms.

 

Circle Time is not Restorative Justice. It does however equip young people with the skills they will use in a Restorative school. Read more about the important differences between Circle Time and Restorative Justice Processes.

 

  • Circle Solutions builds resilience and mental health
  • Circle Solutions enables all voices to be heard so maximises inclusion and participation
  • Circle Solutions promotes empathy, reduces bullying and fosters belonging. Circle  Solutions focuses on both the reflective and the fun in learning.

 

This full day workshop (9.30am - 3.30pm) will equip participants with all they need to begin and sustain Circles successfully with a class or youth group. We will:

 

  • introduce the philosophy and principles underpinning Circles
  • give participants the opportunity to experience a range of Circle activities and learn how to run a Circle Solutions session
  • outline recent research on maximising the effectiveness of Circle Solutions
  • report on what teachers and students say about the differences it makes
  • give opportunities to ask questions and explore issues
  • provide information on resources

 

"Inspiring both in terms of ideas and as a philosophy of learning and living"

"This has provided practical ideas that I feel confident about introducing to my class"

"Practical solutions to serious problems and things I can do immediately"

"I found every practical element and every circle time activity fun and educational"

Read more about the important differences between Circle Time and Restorative Justice Processes.

 

 

DEVELOPER: Dr. Sue Roffey is a teacher, educational psychologist and academic. She has researched and written extensively on issues about behaviour and wellbeing in school.

 

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Teaching Restorative Thinking and Behaviour to Primary Students:

Using Circle-Time to teach Restorative ways of Living

 

Workshops from 2 hours to a full day

 

Thinking and Behaving Restoratively doesn't come naturally to all kids. Restorative Practices is a way of thinking about people and events and it's a frame of reference that we can teach to young people. What's the result? Calmer, more peaceful and more productive classrooms and playgrounds. Evidence shows that schools that actively teach Restorative Thinking and Behaviour to students report less bullying behaviour, less anxious kids, less anxious parents and happier teachers.

 

In this workshop Bill will demonstrate ways to teach restorative thinking and skills to primary children through the well-established pedagogy of Circle Time. This fun and interactive workshop will take staff through some activities from Bill’s resource “The Grab and Go Circle Time Kit for Teaching Restorative Behaviour”, giving staff colleagues a good feel for the content and approaches that build restorative brains. As it turns out, this workshop also builds restorative thinking and behaviour in your staff!

 

 

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Circle Solutions Trainer Training

 

Delivered by Bill as an Associate of Sue Roffey

 

This two-day program is available to anyone who has taken an Introduction to Circle Solutions. It will enable participants to introduce, support and sustain Circle Solutions in schools, including facilitating staff training.

 

The program will cover:

  • A whole school approach to developing positive relationships, resilience and connectedness

  • Being an agent of school change

  • The rationale for Circle Solutions and the value to schools

  • Recent research on what makes Circle Solutions effective

  • Planning and running a staff training day

  • Liaison with parents

  • Dealing with challenges from staff and students

  • Supporting the sustainability of Circle Solutions

    Each participant will receive:

    51eiPUtGtRL._SY445_.jpg

  • A copy of Circle Solutions for Student Wellbeing

  • Copy of PowerPoint (copyrighted) for training school staff

  • CD containing articles and materials

  • Certificate indicating the participant is an accredited Circle Solutions trainer.

  • Plus six months of email support from Sue Roffey Associates

 

 

 

Please note that the course is designed for trainers to train within their own school and to embed Circle Solutions as a tool for wellbeing. Any further schools that are trained by accredited trainers must register as a CS school for a small fee. Trainers are asked to sign a copyright license that includes these conditions

 

 

 

*Prerequisite Introductory 1 day Training undertaken with one of the following:

  • Sue Roffey Associates: Sue Roffey, Ali Palmer or Bill Hansberry

  • an Accredited Circle Time Solutions Trainer (ie someone who has completed this Trainer course)

 

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Workshops for Understanding and Tricky Student Behaviour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeling more Relaxed in the face of Tricky Behaviours: Understanding Emotion and the Goals of Misbehaviour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How often do we take a close look at our own emotions and how challenging student behaviour affects us? Some call this ‘teacher mindfulness’. Whatever you want to call it, an awareness of our own emotions is crucial to good teaching. Our job demands we be at our best so we can help students perform at their best – no small task!

 

This highly engaging and interactive staff workshop is aimed at helping school staff reduce some of their anxieties (feel more relaxed) about tricky student behaviour by better understanding the emotions, beliefs and inner thoughts that drives it!

 

As you can see by the above image of the flip board that greeted participants at a recent workshop, the goals of this professional learning day are clear:

 

  1. Experiencing Interest and Enjoyment are mandatory! This is where we learn best and are more able to face and deal with what worries us about our work with kids.

     

  2. Looking closely at the shame family of emotions (After Affect-Script Psychology, the theory of emotion behind Restorative Practices) and how shame can either spur us on to positive behaviour change, of send us spiraling into behaviours that diminish our human performance and risk our connections with others (Nathanson’s Compass of Shame)

     

  3. Studying Adler and Driekur’s 4 Goals of Misbehaviour (after Individual Psychology) and how we are all motivated for social recognition – belonging. We look at attention seeking, power seeking, revenge seeking and ‘I’m not good enough’ behaviours and how we can help kids re-script through our responses to their behaviours.

     

This workshop is one of emotional growth and connection as participants spend time in circles, small groups and pairs, processing the information that Bill shares. Staff talk and reflect on the emotional interactions between themselves and the young people who depend on their emotional steadiness day in day out.

 

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Understanding the Four Goals of Misbehaviour:

Responding in Calm and Clever ways

 

Tricky kids unconscious thinking often goes something like this:

I only matter when I’m:

  • keeping people busy with me (Attention)

  • in charge, doing only what I want and challenging authority (Power)

  • Delivering payback to those who’ve thwarted me (Revenge)

  • Proving the world ‘I can’t’ and that everyone should just give up on me (Displays of Inadequacy)

 

Whatever theory of human motivation you subscribe to; one common idea has endured the decades: humans are hardwired to seek a sense of connection belonging within the social groups they exist in.

 

When we get our heads around the idea that many of the tricky behaviours we see from young people are related to discouragement and mistaken beliefs about ‘how I belong here’, a new world of possibilities opens up and we no longer take their tricky behaviours so personally.

This fun and dynamic workshop teaches what the fathers if individual Psychology – Alfred Adler and Rudolph Driekurs first taught early in the last century.

 

We will look at the 4 goals of misbehaviour and the hidden beliefs and self-talk that lie beneath. Why do we need to know this? So our own responses to these trick misbehaviours don’t reinforce them – like they have so far! We only change the behaviour of young people by altering our own behaviour first - by responding in calm and clever ways.

 

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Shame and Other Emotions of Connection and Engagement:

The Emotional foundations of Restorative Practices, Engaging Kid’s Hearts and Minds to bring Positive behaviour Change

 

Two hour through to a full-day Workshop

Have you wondered why is is that one person might handle a tough moment by quietly moving away for a moment, while another will explode into violence? The difference lies in how they handle feelings of embarrassment and humiliation – a group of emotions that Psychologist Silvan Tomkins called affect shame.

 

Scratch beneath any behaviour that involves an attack on another person and you will find shame; feelings many of us manage through a range of over-the-top, compensating behaviours that offer some short term relief from shame, yet, take a devastating toll on our connections to others.

 

When we have a framework for understanding, recognizing and teaching kids about shame, amazing behavioural transformations take place. We can transform how we deal with any moment in life that might make us feel lesser than or diminished.  The applications of this are endless, ranging from engagement in learning to conflict resulution. When we better understand shame, our application of Restorative Practices becomes instantly more effective.

 

In this workshop, Bill introduces participants to Affect Script Psychology (ASP) – a powerful theory of human emotion and motivation that explains the how and why of caring. We will explore affect as the biological basis of emotion and how each of our nine inborn affects motivates us in different ways to ensure survival.

 

Most importantly, participants will learn through examples and case studies ways to help young to deal with shame in safe and pro-social ways. Understanding shame is critical for emotional intelligence and safe and connected communities.

 

When adults and students understood shame, schools become safer, more peaceful and productive places where relationships are built and restored much more effectively.

 

 

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‘The Teacher Hates Me’:

Getting Better Outcomes when Discussing Behaviour with a Middle School Student

 

Two hour through to a half-day Workshop

 

No teacher likes hearing that a student thinks that they are picking on them. Even we teachers are sensitive souls who would prefer to be liked! When young people think we don't like them, it’s a clear signal that the teacher student relationship has broken down, or simply never existed.

However, good teaching isn’t a popularity contest! Young people don’t always have to agree with what we do. Believing that it’s our job to please kids puts us in a permissive space; this just doesn’t work in classrooms. What serves young people best is a teacher working from an authoritative space – where Restorative Practice lives and breathes.  

 

This workshop is dedicated to the values and strategies that work best when we need to have a conversation with a student about the inappropriateness of their behaviour. Often, this conversation will follow some form of disciplinary referral.

 

Many teachers shy away from following up with young people after they have referred them on to senior staff to ‘be disciplined’. It’s understandable! These types of conversations take a heavy emotional toll and teachers have to be at their emotional best, particularly when the young person involved is struggling to see the issue from the perspective of others, or just isn’t good at owning their behaviour! When these conversations don’t go the way we had hoped, it’s all too easy to puff out our chest, put our hands on our hips and remind the young person involved why they should respect our authority and what will happen if they don’t! The result: less understanding, more disciplinary referrals and the student may even fail the subject. Everybody loses.

 

Over the years, Bill has compiled and refined what he calls ‘The 6 Tips’. These six concepts take teachers through what they can think, say and do, that will give them the best chance of helping a young person to own their behaviour and see the teacher as an advocate, not the enemy! These six tips have been drawn from areas such as:

  • Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

  • The work of Bill Rogers

  • Restorative Practice

  • Ethical Influence (Chialdini)

  • Affect Theory (Tomkins)

  • Reintegrative Shame Theory (Braithwaite)

 

Bill brings these theories together to help teachers deconstruct and then reconstruct this crucial skill-set of following up and following through with a young person after things have gone wrong.

 

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Workshops for Understanding and Working with Dyslexia

 

 

 

The 3Ds: Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyscalculia

A Workshop for Teachers, Parents and School Support Staff

 

This highly sought after workshop can be a full-day workshop or can be adapted to run over 2x2 hour sessions.

 

"A wealth of knowledge - fantastic!"

"Inspirational"

"Full of valuable information that I can put into practice"

"High interest, very inspiring"

"Great presentation - I could have listened all day"

 

 

This workshop explains three common but largely misunderstood learning disabilities that affect many students : dyslexia (reading and spelling), dysgraphia (writing output, spelling and written expression) and dyscalculia (mathematics).

Bill explains in a fast paced and multi-modal way how these conditions affect students' ability to participate in the curriculum, what to look out for, and how to differentiate to accommodate the needs of young people living with these specific learning disabilities. Most importantly, Bill communicates to participants how it feels to live with these conditions.

This workshop is a life-changer for teachers and the students they work with.

 

 

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Emma and Bill’s Amazing talk about Dyslexia:

A Workshop for Students and Teachers

 

 

This 1-hour workshop was first run with one of the wonderful students Bill works with. Emma wanted to be able to communicate to her classmates what Dyslexia is and the different ways it can affect students at school. Most importantly, Em wanted her peers to know that having Dyslexia doesn’t mean that you are dumb!

 

So Em and Bill put their heads down and planned a workshop and presented it together to Em's year 5 class. It was a hit and Em's dad said that Em walked taller afterward. What a wonderful outcome for a young person!

 

Since then, Bill has delivered this same workshop with other students in other classrooms with a similar result – more understanding about dyslexia! Teachers also comment that they learn a lot from this session.

 

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Teaching Students with Dyslexia:  Levels 1 – 3

 

 

 

Teaching Students with Dyslexia (TSD) has been delivered all over Australia  for people wanting to learn to effectively support severely dyslexic students who have not responded to mainstream reading intervention programs.

 

The complete training spans three levels, each consisting of three days of intensive, highly practical training. Those who wish to follow the training right through the three levels will have, upon completion, trained for nine days and amassed the understandings and materials to deliver a remedial program that is considered the gold standard in dyslexia remediation.

 

Tutors who meet our training standards and who commit to ongoing professional development with us may be placed on the South Australian Literacy Specialists (Dyslexia) Register - SALS(D). This register has become a trusted referral resource for local Educational Psychologists and other Specialist Tutors already on the register.

 

 

 

Teaching Students with Dyslexia Level 1 (TSD1)

Next course April 2018 School Holidays

(16th - 18th April )

 

Registration Form

"Amazing - hard to explain, just amazing!"

"I can't wait for level 2. Such a fantastic, informative , fast paced and well researched course "

"Thankyou for a very informative and interesting 3 day course. I know I will use so much in my job"

"Clear information, excellent opportunities to ask questions in a 'safe' environment"

"Thankyou for a well balanced and explicit presentation by experts"

 

TSD1 is designed to provide teachers and educational support staff with an understanding of the learning style of students with dyslexia .The main focus will be to introduce participants to content and methodology most effective when tutoring in a withdrawal situation. It will also provide participants with knowledge and strategies to cater for the children’s needs in the classroom                                

                                 

This three day program is based on research (Oakland, Black, Stanford et al., 1998) which indicates that remedial instruction for students with dyslexia needs to incorporate:

  • Highly structured phonetic-instruction training with a heavy emphasis on the alphabetic system.
  • Drill and repetition are also necessary to compensate for difficulties in verbal working memory.
  • Multi-sensory methods are required to help anchor verbal information through non-language mental representations.
  • Learning objectives need to be highly sequential because the logic of language structure may escape these students.
  • Comprehension and meta cognitive processes need to be taught to assist these students in the conscious use of language rule systems to guide their reading and spelling.

 

The course combines theory and practice, but practical teaching strategies are the main focus. Observation of Alison tutoring children is part of the course. Participants will be given a certificate to verify their attendance and completion of the course. For those seeking further training in the methodology advocated for tutoring students with dyslexia, a Level 2 Course will be conducted at a later date.

 

 

Teaching Students with Dyslexia Level 2 (TSD2)

Next course October 8-10, 2018

 

Registration Form

 

TSD2 focuses on the practical application of a structured multi-sensory program and will follow the Playberry Multisensory Program structure. Participants will be required to prepare a full lesson and teach it to a partner on the final day.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Teaching Students with Dyslexia Level 1.

 

Topics covered:

  • Programming and evaluating progress and their response to intervention (RTI)
  • Examining and comparing Educational Psychologists’ reports
  • Visual analysis of words through coding
  • Working with multi-syllable words
  • Preparing structured, multi-sensory worksheets and learning tasks in line with the teaching structure
  • Preparing structured reading material in line with the teaching structure
  • Assisting students to develop written expression
  • Study skills and memory strategies

 

 

Teaching Students with Dyslexia Level 3 (TSD3)

Next course likely to be 2019 - dates to be confirmed

 

TSD3 will focus in more depth and detail on the practical application of a structured multi-sensory program and will follow the Playberry structure.

 

Prerequisite: Completion of Teaching Students with Dyslexia Levels 1 and 2.

 

Topics covered:

  • Practical sessions on assessment resources and evaluation procedures which teachers can use to identify students with dyslexia.
  • Phonology and morphology in more detail
  • Introduction of new teaching points using directed discover teaching (DDT)
  • Examining the structured program, focusing on the 2nd half of the teaching points.
  • Revisiting spelling rules and grammar.
  • The importance of learning strategies and content for students with dyslexia
  • Evaluating students’ progress.

 

Prior to commencement of the course  teachers will be required to assess a child using some of the recognized assessment tests and write a report on their findings and recommendations.  The report to be presented for group discussion on the Friday  

On the final day teachers will be required to introduce an advanced Teaching Point of their own choice to a partner.  Group discussion and evaluation will follow.

 

 

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The Secret Life of the Dyslexic Learner:

Simple ideas for Teachers

 

half or full day Workshop

 

 

Intelligence masks Dyslexia and Dyslexia masks intelligence

 

 


Students with dyslexia suffer terribly  from shame and self doubt and often go to extreme lengths to hide their difficulties. If they haven't received adequate remediation, by High School, dyslexic students often become frustrated, demoralised and disengaged. They are frustrated by the fact that they process information, read and write much more slowly than their peers and therefore become overwhelmed by the quantity of work expected. No matter how hard they try, their written work rarely reflects their ability. They have likely had many well-intentioned, but misinformed teachers accuse them of being lazy or inattentive and not working to their potential.

 

The single biggest hurdle we put in front of students with dyslexia in schools is not understanding their dis-ability with language the printed word. This workshop aims to help participants to develop an understanding of:

 

  • The agonising embarrassment of living with dyslexia that many young people experience at school
  • What it can feel like to live with dyslexia (through simulation activities)
  • What developmental dyslexia is and its place as a specific learning disability
  • Current research on the neuroanatomy of the dyslexic  reading brain (Shaywitz)
  • Subtypes of dyslexia
  • The phonological deficit and how it might present in young people
  • Spotting Dyslexia early - markers of developmental dyslexia in young children
  • Tips for classroom teachers - what you can hope to achieve and what you can't do on your own!

 

This is a highly interactive workshop that has participants working together and sharing revelations, stories and new understandings.

 

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Workshops for Understanding and Working with Autism Spectrum Disorders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supporting a Classmate with Asperger’s Syndrome:

A 45minWorkshop for Students and Teachers

 

Life in classrooms and schoolyards is often tough for young people who live with Asperger’s Syndrome. Someone wise once said that children with Asperger’s attract nurturers or predators. In other words, they will draw support from peers, who just intuitively understand their difficulties with social interaction and gently support them, or they will attract unwanted attention of those wanting to set them up or set them off!

 

This 45 minute workshop has the very clear goal to create more nurturers in a class or group. Compassion and understanding are never too far below the surface of even the most seemingly troublesome kids.

 

Based on the work of Carol Gray, this workshop was first planned and trialed with the class of a friend of Bill’s called Jack.  Jack wanted a way to communicate to his peers that living with Asperger’s makes it hard to guess what others know, hard to read from people’s faces how others feel and hard work out what others expect you to do or say in different situations. Jack was desperate for other kids in his class to not take his social mistakes personally and to see that he was a nice person who would get things wrong sometimes.

 

As well as this, Jack also wanted to share his strengths with his peers and invite them to ask him for help with what he was good at.

 

Since the first presentation with Jack, Bill has used this powerful workshop successfully with many young people and their classes to create better understanding of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

 

 

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